THIS....Is Not Our Conspiracy
Rather... It's Theirs.

Frank Zappa figured it out in 1966
I wore this record out in 1974
peoplehung
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kidshungryu

'They' NEED World Hunger!

And These Five are Only Puppets!

It's ALL Soicial Engineering~Not Convinced?
Consider the Evidence of the last 50 Years
Hidden in Plain Sight~For those With Eyes To see!

Would They Lie To You?

Ahhh....The good Old Days!

No Worries. The Government Has Your Back!
~ In Their Cross-hairs

Twenty-eight National Guard soldiers fired approximately 67 rounds over a period of 13 seconds, killing four students and wounding nine others, one of whom suffered permanent paralysis. Students Allison Beth Krause, 19, Jeffrey Glenn Miller, 20, and Sandra Lee Scheuer, 20, died on the scene, while William Knox Schroeder, 19, was pronounced dead at Robinson Memorial Hospital in nearby Ravenna shortly afterward.

Four Dead In Ohio

May 4, 1970; 52 years ago 12:24 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time

This is a Heart Attack Gun?

Senator Frank Church displays the CIA’s top-secret weapon known as the “heart-attack gun” in 1975. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Recognizing A Growing Need For Subtlety.......

You Really Can't make This Shit Up!

The heart attack gun fired a dart made of frozen shellfish toxin that would enter the target's bloodstream and kill in mere minutes without leaving a trace.

The projectile would be fired from a modified Colt M1911 pistol equipped with an electrical firing mechanism an effective range 100 meters and virtually noiseless.

Shellfish toxins completely shut down the cardiovascular system, would spread to the victim’s heart, mimicking a heart attack and causing death within minutes. Leaving behind a tiny red dot where the dart entered, undetectable to those who didn’t know to look for it.

And now.... For Something Completely......

The My Celium Project

Produce Gourmet Mushrooms

In Abundance
And
Supply Local Restaurants

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